Pastoralism core of livelihoods in Kenya & Uganda drylands

The Open Society Initiative for Eastern Africa (OSIEA) produced a series of blogs and short video films in October 2017 about pastoralism in the drylands of Kenya and Uganda (Karamoja). It reports on its work with pastoralists in collaboration with three local NGOs: Warrior Squad Foundation, Karamoja Development Forum and Friends of Lake Turkana.

  • A community’s sense of self-determination: how pastoral communities are breaking barriers to secure their livelihoods to attain food security”: Access to water and pasture is critical for pastoral communities to sustain their livelihoods … During dry seasons, communities move across borders in search for water and pasture to keep their livestock alive. Mobility has been the single most important pillar of pastoral livelihood system…
  • Building resilience, creating sustainable livelihood systems for communities in Turkana and Karamoja”: Lopeikume Loware, 78, has been a pastoralist in Kotido, Karamoja in Uganda all his life … “I have seen our livelihood system change over the years…. We have seen introduction of crops as a source of livelihood – that’s why we have a lot of sorghum on our land.” But for Loware, pastoralism remains the most resilient livelihood system for communities in Karamoja. “Pastoralism is the backbone of our livelihood system.”
  • Enabling migration moves pastoralists in Kotido, Karamoja, Uganda towards attaining food security”: Pastoralism is a system of survival for pastoral communities, and movement is a central coping mechanism…
  • Livestock is our livelihood” (including less than 2-minute video): Livestock is our life. With livestock we have everything. Last year, when we had a bad drought, crops failed, but it is livestock that saved us …
  • Pastoralism – our food security pillar” (including 6-minute video): Securing the future of pastoralism is central to attaining food security for the over 25% of the population that lives in drylands. Pastoralism has been proven to increase the adaptive capacity for these communities, enabling them to build resilience to attain food security…
  • Story of survival” (including 6-minute video): Pastoral communities in Karamoja and Turkana are negotiating with their neighbours to access water and pasture to keep their livestock alive … these communities are using their negotiation, networking and relationship-building skills to access resources critical for their survival…
  • Towards food security: pastoralism remains the most sustainable livelihood system” (including 2-minute video): With over 14 million eastern Africans currently food insecure, developing pastoral production is central to addressing food insecurity issues in the region. Learn why pastoralism remains the most resilient and sustainable livelihood system for communities living in arid and semi-arid areas…

Posted on 11 December 2017 in Pastoralism & Mobility, Pastoralist Livelihoods & Nutrition